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Trek Across Peru’s Ancient Trails

By next spring chances are you will have spent countless hours buried in books or looking at your lap top or tablet. That’s been your world.

So instead of looking at screen savers, why not see one of the world’s most magnificent sites with your own eyes.

Next May, Humber has organized a trip to Peru, inviting 16 to 20 students to retrace the steps of the Incas, admire colonial cities, explore vibrant markets and meet the locals.

“Peru is very exotic with its different food, language and environment – it will really take students out of their typical elements,” said trip organizer Kevin Smith, a Program Coordinator in Humber’s Tourism Management program.

In fact, whether you are an experienced traveler, or have never been abroad before, Kevin believes this trip will blow your mind. “If you’re 19 and never left Toronto, this will be pretty eye opening,” he said.

From Peaks to Valleys

The 13-day trip includes visits to all of Peru’s top attractions.

You will visit the Cuzco region. Considered the heart and soul of Peru, Cuzco is a fascinating mix of Incan and Spanish culture.

The Sacred Valley on the outskirts of Cuzco is another highlight. This lush, fertile valley has long been the main source of food for the high Andes.

In this valley, you will learn about local culture as you tour bustling markets for hand-painted beads or warm ponchos, and maybe practice some of the local language, Quechua.

How about visiting the highest navigable lake in the world? Lake Titicaca sits at 3,820 m above sea level. You’ll tour the lake by boat, stopping at the Uros floating islands where you will be welcomed into local homes for a two-night stay.

Inca Trail Awaits

While Kevin can’t wait to show all of Peru’s treasures, he’s most excited about the four-day hike along the Inca Trail, finishing at Machu Picchu.

“You should be able to run 5-10kms comfortably,” noted Kevin. “You’re hiking at a bit of altitude. You don’t have to be an iron man runner, but you definitely have to be in reasonable shape.”

The 45 km trail is long and often steep. Each day's journey consists of about seven hours of walking. You will camp along the trail for three nights, with tents set up by porters and meals prepared by a cook.

The first day includes some uphill trekking to the campsite to over 3,100 metres above sea level. There, you’ll see the ruins of Llactapata.

Day two will be the most challenging as you ascend a long steep path to reach the highest point of your trek, Warmiwanusca ('Dead Woman's Pass'), at a height of 4,200 metres, before descending to your campsite in the Pacaymayo Valley.

On day three you’ll climb to the second pass known as Runkuracay where you can enjoy views of the snow-capped Cordillera Vilcabamba before descending to the ruins of Sayacmarca.

Next are the beautiful ruins of Phuyupatamarca, the 'Town above the Clouds'. From here you start your descent to reach your final night's camp by the Winay Wayna archaeological site.

Breathtaking Sight

The last day starts before dawn with hiking at 5:30 am. But when the Inti-Punku (sun gate) opens, it will all be worth it. Your jaw will drop at the spectacular views of Machu Picchu, also known as the Lost City of the Incas.

“You’re just exhausted, but it’s the best feeling in the world,” said Kevin. “This is one of those things you have to do in your lifetime.” On top of this trip being a life-changing experience, Kevin believes it might help you land a job.  

“A lot of employers now look for international experience as a sign of someone who is mature and has a broader understanding of the world. I myself ended up in the travel industry because of a trip similar to this… there’s so many avenues that it could take you” said Kevin.

Each program is designed so that students gain the knowledge and skills to succeed in this sophisticated ever-changing industry. Exact program details subject to change. 

Questions?

Contact Kevin Smith
416.675.622 ext. 5717
kevin.smith@humber.ca